How to Repurpose Video Content

I’m a big fan of finding ways to have the maximum impact with the least amount of work possible. I wouldn’t call it lazy - I’d call it efficient. 

This efficiency model definitely applies to content creation, as well, especially video content. It’s one of the main reasons I love video so much - you can repurpose that “ish” in so many ways, and it literally takes a few minutes to record one video! 

How to Repurpose Video Content

#1: Add Facebook Lives to YouTube

Take a few minutes to clean it up a bit by editing out any chatty small talk you might have done while waiting for people to show up live, and then add an intro with a title and create a thumbnail.

#2: Create Teasers for Social Media

While editing, pull out a few 60-second clips that you can share on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter throughout the week as teaser videos pointing people to your full video on YouTube. 
Videos perform well on every platform, so take advantage of that and upload shorter videos on social platforms.

#3: Create Audio Files from Video

Audio files can be uploaded directly to your website, shared in an email newsletter, overlaid on a graphic for social media, or uploaded to a host like Libsyn and used as a podcast episode.

#4: Upload your full recorded video to YouTube + Facebook

Very few people on Facebook actually leave the platform to click through to links in posts, so uploading your video natively to Facebook potentially doubles the opportunities for your audience to see the content.

Quick tip: upload your video to YouTube and Facebook on different days to spread out the traffic

#5: Write a Blog Post with Show Notes

Embedding video on blog posts helps with overall SEO. Write show notes, minimum of 300 words, for each video and publish it as a blog post. People watching video on your site increases time spent on your content, which Google uses as a ranking factor

Quick tip: Upload your video to YouTube first, then embed and publish in a blog post a couple days later to spread that Google juice around. This gives time for the video to gain a bit of traction on YouTube.

I’m a big fan of finding ways to have the maximum impact with the least amount of work possible. I wouldn’t call it lazy - I’d call it efficient.   This efficiency model definitely applies to content creation, as well, especially video content. It’s one of the main reasons I love video so much - you can repurpose that “ish” in so many ways, and it literally takes a few minutes to record one video!